Tag Archives: recommended

Joss the Seven (Guild of Sevens #1)

Title: Joss the Seven

Author: J. Philip Horne

Series: Guild of Sevens #1

Joss wasn’t expecting anything strange the day he found a note in his locker. But the note led to some experiments with entirely unexpected results. Joss has superpowers. And there’s a Guild of probably-good guys and an equally mysterious bunch called the Mockers who both want to control him. Or maybe just kill him. Either way, he’s in over his head . . .

I really liked this. The seven forms of superpowers are a lot of fun, and offer a lot of potential for mischief. Ghosting through solid objects is one of my favorites (shapeshifting would be my favorite, but that doesn’t come up much in this book). Joss is in some ways blinded by his own determination to learn, as he tries to soak up everything his parents might have known but never told him.

The pacing stays fast throughout. Joss careens from one adventure to the next, and the web around him grows more complicated. We don’t get a lot of answers here about the big picture, but that’s fine, as this is setting up for future mayhem.

Overall this is a fun, fast read. I am very curious where things will go from here on out. The Guild’s next move could change a lot of things. I rate this book Recommended.

Aster Wood and the Book of Leveling (Aster Wood #2)

Title: Aster Wood and the Book of Leveling

Author: J. B. Cantwell

Series: Aster Wood #2

Aster Wood’s quest to find the great wizard Almara—and a way to save Earth—has stalled out. He and Jade are heading to her home because neither of them can think of anything else. Hopefully Almara has left a clue of some kind. But what they find is both more and less than what they hoped . . .

This is a more internal book than the previous. There’s still a fair amount of death-defying escapades, but there’s a lot more reflection and internal struggle. Because this time around, Aster’s confronted with madness that reduces people to shells of their former selves. Worse than the madness is what causes it.

With such a heavy revelation changing the stakes of his adventure, Aster feels underpowered, so I’m hoping an upgrade for his power or equipment comes sooner rather than later. He’s not particularly good at being clever, though he makes the right calls when it counts. I was disappointed that the titular book seems to be merely notes (even if he really needs those notes), but perhaps hidden depths will surface later.

It’s also interesting that Aster is the only person who seems to be wondering what’s behind the villain’s motivations. There’s plenty enough to suggest “he’s just evil” would work fine, but Aster isn’t so convinced. Right now, though, there’s no way to dig into the whys.

I hope Erod shows up again. He and his people would make interesting allies (or bad enemies). I like how solid most of the secondary characters are in these books, even if the nature of the world-hopping plot has many of them leaving as fast as they show up.

Overall, this isn’t a bad continuation, but certainly darker than the previous. I will likely read the rest of the series soon, but I needed to take a bit of a break after reading this for something a bit lighter. I rate this book Recommended.

The Door in the Hedge

Title: The Door in the Hedge

Author: Robin McKinley

This is a collection of longish short stories, all with a fairy-tale feel.

The Stolen Princess – In the last mortal kingdom bordering the realm of the faeries, children go missing relatively often. When a princess is stolen, the balance begins to change between the two countries. This has a familiar setup, with a bit of a twist on the conclusion.

The Princess and the Frog – I liked this take on the princess, the jewels she drops, and the frog himself. It sets the tale in a more concrete kingdom, and brings in a seemingly unstoppable evil, and gives the princess more to do with the ending. It is a bit confusing, though, why the frog actually turns back into a human. It doesn’t seem what happened would have been something to break a curse.

The Hunting of the Hind – This one also takes elements of several fairy tales and weaves them together. A golden hind which drives men mad has struck down the prince, who vowed to stop it from affecting his people, and his little sister steps up to save him.

The Twelve Dancing Princesses – This is probably the best-known fairy tale of the set, and there aren’t any huge surprises here, except for the challenger being an old, retired soldier instead of a young and handsome prince. I liked this one best, because of the way the old soldier approaches life, and how he’s not swayed by the young and beautiful in quite the same way as everyone else. He feels more sorry for the princesses than anything, and even wonders if they want to be saved from their enchantment.

As much as I like these (and I have read this set before, though I can’t think if it’s been more than once), I don’t feel the same draw to them as some of the other books McKinley wrote. These are interesting stories with beautiful language, but they also leave me feeling like I’m done when I finish, rather than feeling like I want to go back and read them again.

Overall, though, it’s a quick read, and worthwhile if you’re at all a fan of fairy tales. I rate this book Recommended.

Dragon Orb (Dragons of Daegonlot #1)

Title: Dragon Orb

Author: Shanlynn Walker

Series: Dragons of Daegonlot #1

Daxon longs to be chosen by a dragon, to be a dragon rider, as so many are in his home of Daegonlot. But at sixteen, he’s old enough that he’s starting to accept it won’t happen. Then a wild dragon appears, gives him her egg, and provides him with a unique opportunity. Although the hatchling refuses to bond with him, they can still be friends . . .

This is well written and interesting, weaving a few layers of mysteries into an otherwise straightforward story. The summary encompasses most of the story, actually, which is the main thing that bothers me. It’s so short! And the end doesn’t feel like any sort of conclusion, more like the break before a next chapter.

That said, I liked the world. The dragon riders have their own town in the mountains, but it’s on a floating island. However, since the story begins from the point of view of a very old wild dragon, she provides some history on the various races of elves, dwarves, and men. The wild dragons are a lot more interesting than the tame ones—deliberately so. And the story of the first dragon rider has some interesting twists.

I didn’t think the quotes heading up each chapter were particularly relevant (and the fact that most of them were from Earth people was a bit incongruous . . . I would have preferred some kind of dragon rider lore), but they didn’t really detract because they were so short.

I would like to continue the series, but I may wait until the third book drops, since the second one also looks to be relatively short, and I doubt Daxon will actually find answers to some of the biggest questions in so little time. I rate this book Recommended.

By the Silver Wind (The Summer King Chronicles #4)

Title: By the Silver Wind

Author: Jess E. Owen

Series: The Summer King Chronicles #4

The pieces are in place: Kjorn and Shard are uniting the various races against the wyrms, renewing old ties and forging new alliances. But Shard is uneasy. He wants to settle things peaceably, and Kjorn is fired up for war. Even though he knows war may be the ultimate answer, Shard continues to try dreaming with Rhydda, the old female wyrm. Meanwhile, in the Silver Isles, Sverin’s reign of terror has come to an end. But the pride is beginning to fracture as it waits for the return of its king . . .

This was a little slower than the other three books, which wasn’t entirely a bad thing. It would’ve felt way too rushed to simply have the alliances, but the slow task of running to various groups and convincing them was less interesting to me than a more action-packed plot. Mbari is amazing, though. I like all the lions, who are both mystical and playful.

It was also very interesting to see Sverin interact with his pride from a position of weakness, not power. He’s the last character I would’ve expected to actually learn something from all he went through, but he does, and he changes (and there’s a hint of a thing going on that I really didn’t expect, but frustratingly Sverin’s decision cuts a lot of things short, and I wish he hadn’t done that).

I also like how so many things come full circle here. Kjorn and the Dawn Spire. Shard and the Silver Isles. The missing piece of the puzzle that finally explains the presence of the wyrms, and why they hunt gryfons above all else.

Although I didn’t have quite as much fun with this as I did the earlier books, it’s still a good ending. This book finishes off the series very well, and although there’s a lot of room for more books in this world, the particular tale that started in Song of the Summer King does close here. I rate this book Recommended.

Song of the Summer King (The Summer King Chronicles #1)

Title: Song of the Summer King

Author: Jess E. Owen

Series: The Summer King Chronicles #1

Shard is a young gryfon eager to prove himself—for as one of the conquered Vanir, he has extra reasons to be cautious of his Aesir king, who hates the Vanir. Not that Shard remembers the Conquering, which happened when he was a kit. But Shard is soon drawn into a web of conflicting loyalties, and he will have to decide where his heart truly lies. . .

I’ve been meaning to read this for a while, and finally got around to it since the first book showed up free. I never did get over my dislike of how gryfon is spelled (despite this being one word that has about a dozen legitimate spellings), but the story was very good.

There aren’t any humans or human variants here. Shard is a gryfon, and the various other races he meets includes wolves, ravens, and so on. I liked that a lot, since it meant the story could focus on characters with wings and claws and fur and feather. It doesn’t overdescribe the gryfons or their way of life, but the details are plentiful and immersive.

I liked Caj, and how he wasn’t at all who I expected (or who Shard expected, come to that). I liked the different tribes of Vanir and Aesir, and how they value different approaches to life, and how Shard seems to be the only one able to see good in both sides, which makes him feel caught between choosing one path or the other. The Aesir did horrible things to the Vanir, true enough, but for all that Shard recognizes they aren’t necessarily evil. I liked that the tribes are also physically different, which leads to some interesting contrasts between Shard and his wingbrother.

And then the end had to go and tangle everything up. Not that it was a bad ending—but it changes everything for Shard, and who he thinks he is, and who he chooses to become. He’s just not there yet. The next books should be interesting indeed. I rate this book Recommended.

The Harbors of the Sun (Raksura #5)

Title: The Harbors of the Sun

Author: Martha Wells

Series: Raksura #5

The Raksura are furious. And afraid. Jade, Moon, and a handful of others left the Reaches to prevent the frightening dreams and visions no one could understand—and instead may have caused them. Now on the trail of the Hians who betrayed them all, they can only struggle to recapture what was lost, and hope they aren’t too late.

This finishes out the duology that started in The Edge of Worlds, though it has some interesting ties back to the earlier Raksura books as well.

Like the other Raksura books, this one features a plethora of strange cities and alien races. I like the hints of earlier eras mingled with later, like ruins other races repurposed for their own ends. And the glimpses blend very naturally into the story. Moon is on a journey, but the story has additional threads with Jade, with Bramble and Merit, and with the court of Indigo Cloud they all left behind.

I like the characters a lot, too. It’s so amusing to see Pearl and Malachite finally meet: two feared/respected reigning queens with very strong opinions who aren’t used to anyone telling them no. It’s interesting to see how Stone and Moon, despite both being well-traveled, are so different in their approach to other cultures. And of course the half-Fell queen that nobody has any idea how to handle.

I also appreciated not only Jade’s choice near the end, but how efficiently she makes it. She knows exactly what’s at stake and acts first, knowing she’ll have a chance to think about the consequences later.

Although the end neatly closes out the duology, this is a rich world that would easily support more stories. I’ve always enjoyed my time in this world and this book continues that. I rate this book Recommended.