Tag Archives: Manga

Further Thoughts – Yona of the Dawn

I wanted to jot down a few further thoughts on Yona, since I had a chance to review the dub, and I wanted to mention a few things in a bit more depth about the manga.

The dub is serviceable, but most of the characters didn’t feel great in their roles. Gija is a major exception, as his voice actor absolutely nails his bug-related freakouts, but others like Jaeha don’t have any transition between their comedy portions and their regular voices, which made Jaeha sound more monotone than his Japanese voice. Or there are odd moments like Yun using his obviously male voice when talking to Yona during a period when he’s disguising himself as a girl—and none of the other girls figure this out until so much later it feels really stupid. In addition his attempts to sound feminine are still gravelly.

As an added annoyance, this disk is the first anime I’ve watched that didn’t allow me to put subtitles on when I was watching the English, which is how I prefer to view dubs. That allows me to more easily evaluate where the dub changed the script, or catch lines that might be muttered or in the background.

Jeno/Zeno is still my favorite. (Looks like he’s officially Jeno, but it sounds like Zeno in the Japanese, and we already have Jaeha, so I prefer Zeno.) His little “we can totally storm the castle” speech in the last ep is the first big hint that he’s more than he appears—why the massive amount of confidence when he’s previously described himself as basically powerless?

And when the manga finally shows his ability in chapters 99-100, Zeno demonstrates he could probably storm the entire castle by himself. And win.

**MANGA SPOILERS**

I love how Zeno’s backstory is basically: the other three dragons never let him fight because he was weak, and then when they got old and retired, he went out and did everything by himself. He’s unkillable but not invincible, as Shin-Ah demonstrates by tying him up. So despite having massive powers, he doesn’t unbalance the plot because his personality isn’t suited for fighting, and because in order to trigger those powers he’s first got to take deadly levels of injury.

I adore his initial battle, as his ineffectual resistance slowly transforms into complete invincibility. And all his friends are shell-shocked from the moment he first gets stabbed through the heart . . . and he’ll take way more damage than that before he’s done. One of my favorite frames is the panel after he’s been stabbed multiple times, dismembered, and beheaded, and is standing there with ruined clothes but a whole body and taunting the enemy: “What will you do? Unlike you, I have no limits. I can go on fighting for hundreds of years. Come at me. I have all the time in the world.”

And then they find out that he’s not only unkillable, but after a certain point he can’t even take injuries anymore, and they’re now fighting a dragon just as ferocious as Gija and Jaeha combined.

It really is a shame it’s going to take so long to get volumes 17-18 in English.

I like how the dragons are becoming more and more a group of friends. Zeno admits the original four never really meshed that well, as the thread of competitiveness disrupted the sense of being a team. But the current group demonstrates again and again their willingness to support each other, which is perhaps a reflection of Yona being weak where King Hiryuu was strong. Yona can’t pull her own weight in fights the way he did. And Zeno isn’t volunteering to hurt himself as long as the other three canĀ  handle things without his help, but if the situation calls for it, he’ll cheerfully offer to undergo hideous pain because he knows he can take it.

I also like how the manga has generally moved towards longer plot arcs. Su-won turns his attention to the surrounding kingdoms, and Yona for one reason or another is in the middle of things, which means plenty of time to explore the other nations. It raises some interesting questions about Su-won’s ultimate goal, as his short-term aspirations are building up Kouka and reducing his neighbors so they won’t face external threats. He doesn’t seem like he wants to invade, so I do wonder what he’ll get up to once the last neighbor has either submitted or lost a war with him.

At any rate, it’s a shame that the anime doesn’t look likely to go any farther. The plot continues to improve, the characters have a lot of interesting revelations, and the surprises keep on coming.

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07-Ghost (manga)

Title: 07-Ghost
Volumes: 1-17 (Complete)

Ten years ago, war broke out between the Barsburg Empire and the Raggs kingdom. Teito Klein, orphaned by this event, had been pressed into service as a battle sklave for Barsburg, which made him less than popular at the military academy he attends. However, one other boy, Mikage, persists in being his friend, which leads to trouble for both of them when Teito unexpectedly runs across someone from his dimmest memories . . .

It’s hard to give a decent summary of this, because so much of the story revolves around who Teito is, what he does (and doesn’t) remember and why, and how those memories influence him to make the journey he ultimately takes. I liked it a lot as a fantasy. There’s a lot to be said for a story that spans 17 volumes but knows from the beginning where it wants to go, and doesn’t detour at all along the way. As a story, the focus on playing up possibly-romantic relationships between guys unfortunately takes away from some of the more complex relationships that are trying to develop.

I liked the layers of mystery. Teito hasn’t forgotten his origins because he was very young (about four) when everything happened, but also because his memories were deliberately locked away from him. Even that young, what he knew was dangerous. Even now, remembering the wrong thing at the wrong time could ruin everything.

And the world itself has layers. On the purely human level, the Barsburg Empire has all but wiped out the kingdom of Raggs, and they’re eager to move in on what remains. But a large part of the story is also about spiritual matters. The King of Heaven allows every soul to choose three wishes for which to live its life, and once those three are fulfilled, the soul returns to him. However, evil forces offer to grant those wishes in exchange for the soul—and they are working to lay the foundation for the return of Verloren, the god of death. Seven “ghosts” were assigned from heaven to help keep Verloren imprisoned, and Verloren’s body and soul were separately sealed. But he’s working out a plan for revival.

In the beginning, when everything is just starting to unfold, it can feel a bit random. Ayanami remains a good villain, but the Black Hawks in his group struggle to feel meaningful for a long time. I liked how Mikage—and his admonition to Teito against revenge—form a key part of Teito’s struggle, up to the very end. Teito dearly wants to honor his best friend’s wishes, but at the same time, he’s human. He wants justice for all the evil that Ayanami inflicted, as well as revenge for all the pain and suffering.

I don’t really care for the hinting at homosexual relationships in the story (especially with Frau, because he’s got to be twice Teito’s age), but as the hints stay relatively subtle it didn’t subtract much from the story for me.

The ending is really good. It had a bit more epilogue than I expected, which was nice, and it tied everything up in a surprising yet satisfying way. Which is even better considering the major twist that happened not long before that which subverted a lot of my expectations for how the series was going to turn out. I liked how characters that could have been one-offs like some of the Oaks turn into crucial players. I liked the history of the seven ghosts and how Teito has to untangle some of the things that went drastically wrong for each of them.

Overall this is a pretty good fantasy that takes a few volumes to really dig in. It’s not somethingĀ  I would consider top-tier like Fullmetal Alchemist or Kekkaishi, but it does a good job building a solid story with a number of surprises. I rate this series Recommended.

(Apologies for the glut of posts. I’ve been watching/reading some things over the past season but I don’t like to review them until I’m finished, as I would prefer to look at the overall story than just one episode or a few chapters of manga.)

Assassination Classroom

The students in class 3-E are the outcasts, the rejects, the troublemakers. No one expects them to succeed. Which is why it’s all the more puzzling when an alien creature who blew a huge hole through the moon insists on teaching their class. The creature further claims he’ll destroy the earth in exactly a year—so this year’s classroom, in addition to the usual subjects, is secretly and intensely focusing on a single goal: kill the teacher.

To be honest, although I’d heard a lot of people reviewing this series positively, it took a while for it to grab me. The early episodes feel like they’re all over the place. For a show that’s supposed to be about class 3-E, the beginning spends a lot of time on teachers, outside assassins, and so on that has little to do with the students. And the students are so beaten down by their position that even this highly unusual assignment can fail to make them interesting. The way episodes were often two different stories each told in about ten minutes didn’t help keep my interest. Also, the show would tend to really emphasize something, like the split between class E and the other four classes, then totally forget about it for quite a few episodes, which gave the early pacing especially a jerky feel.

But I kept going because it was okay, if not an instant favorite, and was very pleased with how everything turns out. The long arcs that comprise the end of the first season and the end of the series were much more what I had been hoping to see, as the class pushes themselves to use all their newfound skills in serious situations. I also liked some of the smaller moments scattered around, such as the baseball game, Nagisa’s trick against his new PE teacher, and the Nagisa-versus-Karma fight (well, the whole paintball episode was amusing, but that fight made it one of my favorites).

For the characters, the demure and girlish Nagisa, who narrates much of the story, ties with Karma for my favorites. Nagisa’s not one to stand out most of the time. He’s average at most things, but where other students start showing talents for brawling or sharpshooting, he’s got talents much more in line with actual assassins. He can read situations and react appropriately, which is often creatively. And when he goes for the kill, he goes for the throat. Yet he is still a kid, and sometimes despite having the right instincts, he’s just up against someone too good for him. His backstory was also extremely good, surprising me with reasons for things like his long hair and his personality.

But Nagisa tends to be highly entertaining or drawing in short bursts. Karma is the series-long selling point for me.

Karma is the kid who, when told on his suspension about the new teacher, remarks: “Oh? I’ve always wanted to kill a teacher.” He’s unflappable, smart, and always smiling—usually while doing some vicious prank or needling with words designed to provoke a fight. The uses he finds for wasabi had me in tears because I was laughing so hard. I’m not sure how this goes in English, because I have a sub-only subscription, but this show is worth watching in Japanese to get the full context of how he’ll use English against English-speakers to taunt them. Basically, whenever Karma gets a particularly devilish smile, I knew I was in for a good time.

The other class members get a fair amount of focus, as do the other teachers. I liked what happened with Asano from the main campus, and how stereotypes don’t control more minor characters like him. (It’s also funny how his basic arrogance hasn’t really changed, despite everything . . . and I wish there was some bonus content showcasing him and Karma going head-to-head when they’re older.)

I really liked the ending. It’s a solid ending that ties up everything for the students and the teachers. After all the drama, we get to see the graduation, and even a bit of what happens next. And although it closes many things, it’s the openness that’s really appealing. You can see these students are now people living out their dreams to the full—taking everything they’ve learned in sometimes surprising ways to tackle the challenge of an adult world. Although I’d LOVE for Nagisa to have a bonus half-episode or so going into more detail, because his looks the most amusing, his final visual is a powerful statement of how much what he learned shaped who he is.

All in all, even though I didn’t care for everything about how the story was told, I overall had a blast. The story has its laughs, but also its heartaches, and it ends as a love letter to the teachers and mentors who have had an unforgettable impact on their students’ lives. I rate this series Highly Recommended.

My Hero Academia

In a world where 80% of the population has some Quirk granting a supernatural ability, real life has come to resemble a comic. Villains prowl the streets, and heros rise up to stop them. Izuku Midoriya wants nothing more than to be a hero, but he’s one of the few Quirkless. Undeterred, he’s set his sights on the most prestigious hero-training high school: UA. Then an encounter with the greatest hero, All Might, gives him an unexpected chance to live out his dream.

I’ve always been fond of superpowers, and My Hero Academia gleefully portrays a huge variety. From augment quirks like the ability to harden one’s body to the ability to manipulate elements like ice and fire to the more alien-looking who sport extra limbs or animal-like features, Quirks can be pretty much anything. Which is not to say all of them are particularly useful, especially for those who want to become heros.

With such a huge percentage of the population sporting some type of power, heros have somewhat supplanted the police when it comes to managing crime. Most of the villains they deal with are low-level criminals, and some heros choose to focus more on rescue operations than crime-fighting. Either way, heros tend to be celebrities, and none more so than All Might. His trademark smile and catchphrase—combined with a staggering amount of physical strength—has made him the top hero.

I really liked what the series does with All Might. He’s traditionally heroic, with a strong sense of justice, but he can also be goofy. His larger-than-life public persona hides a wrecked, weakened man failing from an old injury. I liked his brutal honesty telling Izuku that attempting to be a hero without power was pretty much impossible, and pointing him towards the police as an alternative if he wants to still help people out. I liked that he can admit when he makes mistakes (although I still don’t think he was wrong pointing out that what Izuku can do against superpowered villains is going to be severely limited without some ability of his own). It’s also interesting that for all his greatness (and he is great in a lot of ways), All Might isn’t perfect, and he has his own areas to grow. The strong teacher-student relationship between the him and Izuku, which in many ways is also a father-son dynamic, lends a touching depth to the story.

Because Izuku does end up with a Quirk after all: he inherits All Might’s powers.

From there Izuku must struggle to master the insanely powerful Quirk he now possesses, because although he now has the power to be the hero he always dreamed, the Quirk is in many ways too much for him. So he ends up trying to solve most of his problems without using his Quirk, as using it will break whatever part of his body he tried to strengthen. Izuku is an interesting lead because he frequently shows his thinking is going in a totally different direction than one might expect. He’s a long-term planner, and his hero-worship gave him a vast knowledge of various Quirks and fighting styles. But even beyond that, as he quickly demonstrates in the initial chapters, he’s humble, and inclined to believe better of others than himself. He also understands that he’s starting from the bottom in many ways, and that drives him to work incredibly hard to try to catch up.

In addition to Izuku, the story digs into many of the other students that share his class. The most prominent is Bakugo, someone Izuku has known since they were little, and whose strong Quirk has left him with a mountain-sized ego and a vengeful attitude. But it’s the little nuances to his character that make him such a fun one to follow. Bakugo’s always been the best—but at UA, all the students are the best of the best, and he’s in the odd situation of not only having peers but being outclassed. And despite his looks and attitude proclaiming him a delinquent, he works just as hard as Izuku and refuses to do anything that might get in the way of him becoming the top hero. (Amusingly, one chapter reveals he’s actually got higher grades than Izuku: he may be hot-tempered and short-sighted, but he’s NOT stupid. Which will get very interesting if he manages to put the pieces together about Izuku’s transformation.)

The class, teachers, and villains who round out the cast are also interesting for the most part, though for the sake of length I’ll avoid talking about all of them. Aizawa, Izuku’s homeroom teacher, is one of my favorites. His Quirk is the ability to erase other people’s Quirks (which seems incredibly useful for a teacher at this kind of school, although he rarely has to use it on the students). Although he’s scruffy and disinterested in those without potential, he cares just as much for his students as All Might, and goes to tremendous lengths to protect them from evil.

All in all, if you’ve read or watched any shounen manga or anime you should have a good idea what you’re in for: lots of high-octane fights, a massive cast, interesting powers, and an epic story slowly unfolding through the various smaller challenges the characters must face. As of this post, the anime just finished its 13-episode run, which was my initial introduction to the series. It was hard to stop after episode 13 so I got caught up on the manga in the meantime; the anime is a faithful adaptation, though it’s only gotten through a relatively small part of the chapters released to date. But season 2 is coming! I rate this series Highly Recommended.