The Magic in this Other World is Too Far Behind! #1 (Light Novel)

Title: The Magic in this Other World is Too Far Behind! #1

Author: Gamei Hitsuji

Format: Light Novel

Suimei is walking home with his friends when all three of them are unexpectedly summoned to another world. As they suspected, this world is looking for a hero to defeat the Demon Lord who is bent on annihilating humanity—but Suimei wants nothing to do with it. Luckily, it’s Reiji who was the chosen hero, so even though it disappoints everyone, Suimei can try to sit this one out. But Suimei’s knowledge of modern magic is incredibly advanced in this new world, and his ambition to lead a quiet life is quickly overturned . . .

Although I liked some pieces, the overall execution left me uncertain if I want to continue the series.

I can’t stand Felmenia. She whiplashes from mature and competent to flustered and childish, and although I get the general direction the author was going, the personality shifts feel too extreme. And more than once the story tanks into fetishization, like having her trip over her own clothes just to land her in a pin-up pose that the male character can gawk at. Or the stupid, stupid arguments between the girls about whose breasts are bigger. (It always makes me want to ask, do you know any real girls? I realize this is fantasy, but it’s really tiring and insulting to watch girls behave like brainless twits.)

I actually don’t mind so much the fact that Suimei’s confrontation with Felmenia broke her. That was a fun fight, especially with the layers of magic, and I enjoy seeing her arrogance brought down to size. The whole genius-gifted-kid who could do no wrong because she was so talented getting humiliated was amusing, especially because the narrative is careful to show how the fight is working from both perspectives. She’s in this to show him up, but he’s used to people trying to kill him and is expecting her to at least attempt the same. But that kind of humiliation is based on her personality flaws, and isn’t so much intended to be exploitative.

The conversations about what happens in light novels when people are summoned to another world at the beginning is also a bit too meta for my tastes. There was some amusement at the beginning but eventually I wanted them to stop comparing the situation they were in to the books they had read and just get on with it.

The biggest plus about the book is, as might be expected, the magic. Suimei is a magician of modern Japan—a real magician, but a secret one. And his use of magic reflects various magical traditions from across the globe, from numerology to the technical details of how to create a golem and more. He’s familiar with the “elements” that Felmenia mentions, although not in the same form. His passion for understanding the how and why and not—as he pointedly accuses her—making a bigger boom has given him a wide range of skills. And those skills play out like video game spells, which makes them fun and flashy, in addition to the interesting technical underpinnings he spells out.

I also liked that the book bucks tradition a bit by having Suimei sort of caught up in this “hero summoning” by accident, as it’s actually his best friend who receives the prophesied blessings and sets out to confront the Demon Lord. Suimei is himself too horrified by the thought of going one against a million to even bother helping, except to try to make a path for all of them to get home. Given the situation overall, I’d be shocked if he isn’t eventually pulled into the confrontation anyway (against his will), but he’s certainly not going out looking for trouble.

All in all this is a very mixed bag. The harem elements take up enough of the plot to be a significant distraction, and it cheapens most of the female characters. The magical elements are much better, but I’m not certain I like those enough to get past the rest. I rate this book Neutral.

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