Threshold short story roundup

Author: Christa Kinde

Series: Threshold

Due to the shorter length of most of these, I’m lumping all the reviews together. Several of these are currently free to read on Amazon and/or the author’s website. I tried to put them in roughly chronological order, but several of them have overlapping time periods.

Tried and True

Taweel is a Guardian who lost his charge to the plague that devastated Egypt, killing all the firstborn. Grief casts him away from his fellow Guardians, away from any purpose or healing. But the Weavers who shelter him slowly become friends, a yahavim has taken a personal interest, and two young Guardians may break through his sorrow . . .

I dislike the 100-word-chapter format, as every fragment feels far too short, and I would rather have fewer chapters but more length so that the longer scenes don’t keep getting interrupted by breaks. That said, the story itself is good. Guardians prepare and train and devote themselves to a charge, so when Taweel loses his, he’s unable to see a future for himself. He doesn’t INTEND to Fall, but he can’t forget.

This one is also available to read for free on the author’s website (mostly; if you want the epilogue then get the paid version). Recommended.

Angels on Guard

Tamaes has taken his mentor’s lessons to heart, except for the most important one: allowing himself to care for the little girl under his watchcare. But his concern for his own faithfulness could lead to the very outcome he’s trying to prevent . . .

This is a good story, but won’t make much sense without the context of Tried and True. Tameas’s reluctance is entirely based on Adin’s taunts to him about loving his charge too much (and Adin’s Fall happening in part because his charge died). So Tameas is determined not to repeat the mistake.

This is also the story behind Prissie’s lifelong fear of heights, and snippets of it were in the main Threshold series. I liked this fuller treatment, and getting to see exactly what was going on behind the scenes. (Although I would have also loved to let it go a little further to see Tames awkwardly working his way into the role he should’ve had from the beginning. But I can also reread the later interactions he has with her in the books for something similar.) Recommended, but be sure to read Tried and True (and probably the Threshold main novels) first.

Rough and Tumble

Ethan is a Guardian in training, but his Sending comes well before he feels ready for it. Still, he goes eagerly to his charge: Zeke Pomeroy.

This is another 100-word-chapter one, and again, I’m not too fond of the format, but the story is amusing. Zeke Pomeroy was born wild, and for all that Ethan loves him, he really struggles to keep up. Although this is another story about Guardians, Ethan has a much different perspective on the role than Tameas (I also thought it was cute how Jude’s Guardian has a lot in common with Jude). Recommended.

Angels All Around

Milo is excited to begin his time as a Graft, an angel who lives a human life among humans (at least, when he isn’t called on to resume angelic duties). But the Messenger’s plans fall apart as soon as he walks out the front door. . .

This is another one that tells an event from the main Threshold novels from the perspective of the angels instead of Prissie. In this case, it’s the incident where Milo and Prissie first met in the gazebo in the middle of town. It’s funny to see Milo’s take on the whole thing, because there’s a battle going on all around that he has to pretend he can’t see, and Prissie isn’t at all what he expected. This story is also free. Recommended.

Angel on High

Among the stars, a new angel comes into being. Koji is full of questions, eager to learn and understand. But not all new knowledge is pleasant . . .

This is my favorite of the shorter works (so far, at least). Not only does this story touch on the very beginnings of an angel’s life, the angel in question is Koji, who can’t help trying to figure everything out. Some of his questions go deep, and some are just funny.

The end of this overlaps with the beginning of The Blue Door, retelling his original encounter with Prissie from his point of view. Prissie was annoyed to find a possible trespasser, but Koji is panicking because he never expected to end up interacting with humans, and has no idea what he should do.

I wish this had been novel-length, because it felt like it ended way too fast, but what’s here is sweet and hilarious. Highly Recommended.

Angels in Harmony

This is basically a two-part short story. The first half covers how Baird and Kester first met, and the second half takes place shortly before Christmas and covers a holiday challenge between the two Worshipers (and actually fills in a missing piece from the Threshold novels, mainly, what Prissie ended up giving all her angelic friends for Christmas).

Like all the shorter pieces, this was a good look into the more personal side of some of the angels. Baird’s mostly enthusiastic in the novels, but here we see another side of him: someone whose mood can swing down almost as far as it goes up (Kester, in contrast, is extremely steady). Between Ephron’s capture and some of the hazards of life on earth, Baird can’t always maintain a smile. Kester, in contrast, is longing for a chance to be a mentor himself, but he takes his current apprenticeship with good grace, and aims to support Baird as best he can.

The second half can be a bit jerky due to the quick transitions, but all in all this is still a really fun piece. Currently this one is also free. Recommended.

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