The Dreamer’s Awakening (Eloik: Nightmare Fighter #1)

Title: The Dreamer’s Awakening

Author: Martin Bois and Sebastian Levek

Series: Eloik: Nightmare Fighter #1

Eloik has always let fear rule his life. But as a danger which lives in dreams reaches out across to the waking world, he’ll have to conquer his worst nightmares.

Oh good. I’m finally done with this.

I really had to force my way through this. The execution stumbles at a number of points, which took what could have been some good ideas and bogged them down in a story that had me throwing the book at the wall at multiple points.

The first problem was the opening. It begins with an essay that is dry, boring, and left me wondering if I’d actually picked up a work of fiction or a psychology textbook (I actually had to check to make sure I hadn’t pulled one of my nonfiction books by mistake). And the very first sentence has grammatical issues, which doesn’t help the case at all.

Then we get tons of landscape description followed by a scene focusing on two throwaway minions of the main villain. This has little relevance to the plot and is mostly there to showcase the big bad is very scary and Up To Something. The story in general likes to cut away to the villains, which feels completely pointless because we aren’t going back to the same villains (even the Nightmare Queen only shows up once at the very beginning and once at the very end), and everyone portrayed is a flat, cartoonishly evil bad guy. Cartoon evil can work in some cases, but given how seriously the rest of the story is trying to take itself, it really didn’t work for me here.

Then we have the protagonist. Eloik is described as having major social anxiety. Except the way he behaves in no way paints him anything other than COMPLETELY NORMAL. Eloik travels alone for over an hour on public transportation each way, regularly, to get to his mental health appointments. And the appointments themselves are in this giant facility with hundreds of other people, which he sees especially in the big lunch room where he eats with everyone (and he only feels sorry for himself because he has no friends and must eat alone). And on the way home he typically stops in a restaurant for dinner.

Social anxiety? What social anxiety? Here we have Mr. “I’m excused from school because I’m completely unable to deal with other people” . . . dealing with other people. A lot. Complete strangers, too. The only things that even makes him uneasy are a disappearing girl and a bully. THIS IS A NORMAL RANGE OF RESPONSES. So even though the plot keeps emphasizing him being hung up with fear, it’s impossible not to feel like the story is just lying to me.

Add to that the bits that actually are interesting, like his name, are never explained.

Next up was the big sphere used to project “virtual reality” scenarios. This is magic. There are far too many holes for it to work as a piece of technology, like how it creates entire interactive worlds when Eloik isn’t even wearing a headset or gloves to help him interact with it (wrist bracelets? Really?). Basically it would only make sense if it was interacting directly with the brain. It wouldn’t surprise me if the story actually meant it to be a Dream-fueled machine, but Eliok was a fool if he believed this was possible through non-alien levels of technology. I have no problem with magic, but the inconsistency in how it was portrayed bugged me.

THEN the Nazis show up. I wish I was joking.

Look, you have a great big dream world where literally anything is possible, and nothing HAS to follow the rules. You can have evil fluffy bunnies or killer clouds or a Rubik cube that eats your brain. Go wild! Instead, we get Nazis. Because apparently Nazis are and forever will be the pinnacle of evil (and let’s ignore the fact that there were other regimes that killed even more people around the same time period, because Nazis. I get that they’re evil, but I’m so, so sick of Nazis.)

And the story devolves into elaborate conspiracy theories about Nazis, WWII, secret societies, and I’m so close to the end I really want to just be done but I’m wondering if I can force myself to go another few words.

I think this might have been better as a comic, because the pictures were at least interesting, and then I wouldn’t have to put up with a lot of the prose. The prose is often clunky, especially near the end when the whole team is talking with each other. But even being a comic wouldn’t solve the more glaring plot and character issues. Not Recommended.

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