The King’s Traitor (Kingfountain #3)

Title: The King’s Traitor

Author: Jeff Wheeler

Series: Kingfountain #3

King Severn has gone past the point of harsh but not unjust, and is now becoming the very monster everyone said he was. Which leaves Owen in a hard position: continue to support the man who rules over him, or support those who would rather see him fall? And the king’s decision to use Owen’s marriage as a bargaining chip is not a welcomed one—particularly not when Owen finds things going in directions he never expected.

This was the hardest book to read, in a way, but also the best. Owen is no longer young, or idealistic. The loss of his first love (to a happy marriage, no less) has embittered him, and the long-term presence of King Severn and his biting remarks has shaped Owen into someone much more like the king than he wants to be. Owen has little left but his honor, and Severn seems determined to destroy even that.

The plot took several unexpected twists, although I think the title is unfortunate as there can be little doubt as to whom it will refer. But I did enjoy the ambiguity of it all. Owen wants to do right, but it’s terribly unclear what the right thing to do actually IS. He’s so sick of destiny playing the same story of betrayal, revenge, and usurpation that he continually tries to find a better way—but when magic can manipulate the fates of men, is that even possible? Can he trust his own judgement about those who offer support, but might after all be something far worse than the alternative?

I also really liked Owen’s struggles to stay honorable. To be a true knight, even though that costs him some of what he desires. It’s rare to find characters who both struggle with questions of virtue but also ultimately triumph—lust vanquished, and love remains. And I was also impressed at the way it ended. Breaking the cycle of violence isn’t just a platitude. Owen is so serious about it he goes way beyond what I’ve ever seen. And because of that, although it may still go horribly wrong in the future, the ending feels far brighter.

Overall this would be a rather bad book to start on, as watching Owen grow, mature, and change provides a lot of depth to what happens here (not to mention it would spoil a lot of neat things from the earlier books). I rate this book Recommended.

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